September Conferences’ Project Dissemination

TTT presentation photo

I am excited to announce that I have two project papers accepted: one at the BERA Annual Conference in Sussex (Sept 3-5) and the second one is at the ALT Conference in Nottingham (Sept 10-12). A very busy two weeks in September with lots of travelling.

If you are attending any or both of these conferences then feel free to attend my session. I look forward to meeting you.

BERA Conference Accepted Abstract

Title: Evaluating Academics’ Use of iPads for Academic Practices

This paper is based on the findings of the British Journal of Educational Technology (BJET) Fellowship funded project on academics’ use of iPads for academic practices.

Universities are under pressure to both provide Post-PC devices (PPDs) such as iPads and the infrastructure for their use (Murphy, 2011). The argument for the introduction of these devices in higher education is that students are already using such mobile devices. Though mobile technologies (tablets) are not yet as integral to academic practice as the personal computer (PC); they are fast becoming the must-have technology in the HE sector. A critical mass is growing as more academics acquire tablets for personal and professional purposes.

Most iPad pilot studies in the M-Learning literature have primarily focused on students’ use of iPads in higher education. The paper addresses this literature gap by focusing on how academic staff members use their iPads for academic practices? Academic practices for the purpose of this paper refer to three main work-related categories: (1) teaching and learning (2) research and (3) administrative productivity.

An online survey was developed and sent to all academic staff members with iPads at a Yorkshire University. There were 75 survey responses from two groups of academic participants: those who were issued iPads by their schools and those who acquired them using their own personal funds. The survey’s qualitative comments as well as semi-structured interviews with 10 academics were analysed thematically.
Majority of the survey participants found the iPad easy to operate as a result of the device’s intuitive design and they used the device mainly for administrative and research purposes. There was a stated demand for technical and pedagogical training on how to use the iPad for the design and delivery of teaching and learning activities. The paper will also focus on the reported benefits and limitations of using the iPads for academic practices as well as provide a list of popular apps used for academic practices.

References:
Murphy, G. (2011). Post-PC Devices: A summary of early iPad technology adoption in tertiary environments. e-Journal of Business Education & Scholarship of Teaching, 5(1), 18-32. http://www.ejbest.org/upload/eJBEST_Murphy_2011_1.pdf (Accessed January 16, 2013)

ALT Conference Accepted Abstract

Title: To iTeach or not to iTeach: How academics use iPads for teaching and their perceptions of the device’s pedagogical affordances.

This presentation is based on some of the key findings of the British Journal of Educational Technology (BJET) Fellowship funded project on academics’ use of iPads for academic practices.

Though mobile tablets are not yet as integral to academic practice as the personal computer (PC); they are fast becoming the must-have technology in the HE sector. The argument for the introduction of these devices in higher education is that students are already using such mobile devices in their personal lives. There is therefore some pressure on academics to consider how to integrate these educational technologies into their current pedagogical designs and practices.

Most academics using iPads in HEIs either purchased the devices using their personal funds or were given or loaned the devices by their institutions. Twelve academics at a Yorkshire University were interviewed on how they used their iPads for academic practices and their responses were analysed thematically. Academic practices for the purpose of this research study refer to three main work-related categories: (1) teaching and learning (2) research and (3) administrative productivity.

This presentation will focus mainly on the research findings based on the first category. It will explore the pedagogic strategies used by academics to maximise the iPad in the classroom. It will also highlight the challenges of using the iPad as a result of the device’s perceived limited pedagogical affordances. Some of the interviewed academics were issued iPads as well as their students while others only got iPads but their students were not given the device. The implications of these two scenarios on pedagogical design and delivery will also be examined during this presentation.

This session will be of interest to academics and learning technologists using or planning to use iPads as well as other tablet devices in HEIs.

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